Faculty of Humanities

Article Index

Welcome to the Faculty of Humanities

History, Geography, RMPS and Modern Studies play a vital role in today’s society and the department aims to ensure each child has a positive learning experience to enhance their understanding of the world, both past and present.

MEMBERS OF STAFF

  • Ms K Esdaile: (Faculty Head)
  • Mrs L Carrick (History / Modern Studies)
  • Mr D Gallacher (Geography / Modern Studies / Travel & Tourism)
  • Mrs J Higgins (Geography)
  • Miss S O’Brien (Geography)
  • Mrs L Rodgers (RMPS / Modern Studies)
  • Ms S McGeough (Modern Studies / History)

BGE Curriculum

The S1-S2 BGE Social Subjects course is a common course. Normally, one teacher will delivery all four social subjects to the class.

The topics covered in S1- 2 BGE are:

In S3-4 pupils exercise personalisation and choice can choose to study up to three Social Subjects. They will also have a period of core RMPS. Pupils will be presented at National 3, 4 or 5 level. In S3-4, they will study:

National Qualifications (S5-S6)


S1 History

S1 History: One 10 week bloc

An Introduction to History

What is History?

  • Why do we need to learn about the past?
  • Chronology and Time
  • Evidence: Primary and secondary Evidence

Early Scotland

In S1 History we look at early Scotland from the first people to the birth of the nation of Scotland.

  • Why did the first people move to Scotland?
  • What was discovered at Skara Brae?
  • Who were the Celts?
  • How have the Picts been pictured?
  • Were the Vikings all that bad?
  • How was Scotland born?

In the class room

The focus is very much on active learning. Pupils will follow the course through a comprehensive set of PowerPoints with a wide variety of active tasks. Tasks include the use of priority pyramids, card sorts, pictures, maps, card diamonds, library research visit, short video clips and written answers. Pupils are given a Skills and Homework booklet, outlining how to structure answers and possible homework questions for teachers to set as appropriate. Pupils are also given a Learning Log which outlines success criteria for specific assessed pieces and gives pupils a chance to evaluate their learning and set targets for the future.

World of work

Pupils will learn literacy and numeracy skills. They will learn how to prioritise information and present logical arguments. They will be encouraged to think critically and question evidence. Jobs where History would be useful include: academic librarian, archaeologist, archivist, broadcast journalist, civil service administrator, information officer, politician's assistant, solicitor, teacher, historian.


S2 History

S2 History: One 6 week block/ One 4 week block

Medieval Europe

  • Christianity in Europe
  • Mohammad
  • Charlemagne
  • Feudalism
  • The Investiture contest
  • Chivalrous Knights
  • Castles
  • Crusade
  • Black Death
  • Rise of the town
  • Exploration
  • Joan of Arc
  • Renaissance

The Wild West

  • Plains Life
  • Expansion west
  • Disruption of Native American way of life
  • Law and Order

In the class room

The focus is very much on active learning. Pupils will follow the course through a comprehensive set of PowerPoints with a wide variety of active tasks. Tasks include the use of priority pyramids, card sorts, pictures, maps, card diamonds, library research visit, short video clips and written answers. Pupils are given a Skills and Homework booklet, outlining how to structure answers and possible homework questions for teachers to set as appropriate. Pupils are also given a Learning Log which outlines success criteria for specific assessed pieces and gives pupils a chance to evaluate their learning and set targets for the future.

World of work

Pupils will learn literacy and numeracy skills. They will learn how to prioritise information and present logical arguments. They will be encouraged to think critically and question evidence. Jobs where History would be useful include: academic librarian, archaeologist, archivist, broadcast journalist, civil service administrator, information officer, politician's assistant, solicitor, teacher, historian.


S1 Geography

S1 Geography: One 10 week block
An Introduction to Geography

  • What is Geography?
  • World Map work
  • Scottish Map work
  • Scotland’s Features

Earth’s Climate

  • Introduction to climate
  • Climate Graphs
  • Weather and Climate in Scotland
  • Extreme weather in the UK
  • Equatorial Rainforests
  • The Tundra
  • Hot Deserts
  • Adapting to life in the desert
  • Why is our climate changing?
  • Impacts of Climate change
  • What can we do to slow down climate change?

Scotland’s Environment

  • Introducing Coasts
  • Coastal Erosion Features
  • Weather and Climate
  • Rainy Scotland
  • The Highland Midge
  • Sink Holes – Key Features, Effects
  • Energy in Scotland- The Big Issue/ Coal
  • Renewable Energy - Windfarms

In the classroom
The focus is very much on active learning. Pupils will follow the course through a comprehensive set of PowerPoints with a wide variety of active tasks. Tasks include the use of priority pyramids, card sorts, pictures, maps, card diamonds, library research visit, short video clips and written answers. Pupils are given a Skills and Homework booklet, outlining how to structure answers and possible homework questions for teachers to set as appropriate. Pupils are also given a Learning Log which outlines success criteria for specific assessed pieces and gives pupils a chance to evaluate their learning and set targets for the future.

World of work
Pupils will learn literacy and numeracy skills. They will learn how to prioritise information and present logical arguments. They will be encouraged to think critically and question evidence. Jobs where Geography would be useful include: Tourism, Geology, Renewable Energy, Coastal Management, Meteorology, Exploration, Research, Humanitarian Work, City Planning and Environmental Protection.


S2 Geography

Pupils study Natural Disasters and Local Studies in S2 Geography

Topic 1: Natural Disasters: (6 weeks)

The structure of the earth

Pupils will learn about the four layers which make up the earth. They will learn about convection currents, tectonic plates and the Pacific Ring of Fire.

Earthquakes

Pupils learn about the causes and effects of the Mexico City earthquake. They use their numeracy and planning skills to create a plan on how to prepare for earthquakes in San Francisco.

Volcanic Eruptions

Pupils learn about the structure of volcanoes. They learn how two different plate movements cause their eruptions. Pupils take on the role of a volcanologist to plan the evacuation during the Montserrat eruption.

Hurricanes

Pupils have the opportunity to study the formation of hurricanes. They will learn about the conditions needed for their formation, the different stages of a hurricane and how to get hurricane prepared.

Topic 2: Local Studies (4 weeks)

Mapping Skills

Pupils will learn basic map skills such as four figure grid references and map symbols when learning about the physical and human environment of Motherwell.

Urban Geography

Pupils will learn about the different parts of the city and create an urban transect.

Fieldwork and Investigation

Pupils will undertake local fieldwork and produce an investigation on their findings.


S1 RMPS

Religious, Moral & Philosophical Studies - This is the name now used in Dalziel and many departments across Scotland for this subject. The subject is not really “RE”. Nobody is being “educated” to be religious. RMPS involves the study of religion in the world and its impact on our society. Religion is still a major part of life for the majority of the planet’s population. In S1, RMPS will allow students to understand the main faiths, see how they affect the lives of followers in Scotland and around the world. The knowledge that RMPS develops is extremely important in understanding the world and the society that we live in. The Scottish Curriculum for Excellence states that the challenge of religions to our society are to be explored. Some of the most pressing problems facing our society are sectarianism, Islamophobia and hate crime. This unit examines how the media’s portrayal of global events and terrorism can distort society’s views of religion. This unit tries to remedy this and to help pupils see that they themselves can play an active role in combating these potentially divisive problems.

Courses

In S1 RMPS pupils study two topics:

1. Introduction to World Religions 2. Religion in Scotland – Through the Ages

Course Content

Unit 1: Introduction to World Religions

  • What is belief?
  • Types of belief
  • Religious Belief
  • The Six Major World Religions

Unit 2: Religion in Scotland – Through the Ages

  • Ancient Scottish Religion
  • Christianity Comes to Scotland
  • Changing Christianity in Scotland
  • Sectarianism in Scotland
  • Religious Diversity in Scotland

In the class room

The focus is very much on active learning. Pupils will follow the course through a comprehensive set of PowerPoints with a wide variety of active tasks. Tasks include the use of priority pyramids, card sorts, pictures, card diamonds, library research visit, short video clips and written answers. Pupils are given a Skills and Homework booklet, outlining how to structure answers and possible homework questions for teachers to set as appropriate. Pupils are also given a Learning Log which outlines success criteria for specific assessed pieces and gives pupils a chance to evaluate their learning and set targets for the future. Pupils will also develop their Literacy, Numeracy, Health and Wellbeing throughout the S1 courses through a variety of tasks, peered work and group investigations.

World of work

Pupils will learn literacy and numeracy skills. They will learn how to select information and present arguments. Pupils will be encouraged to think critically and form reasoned opinions on a variety of issues. Jobs where RMPS would be useful include: Assistant-immigration-officer, MSP, MP, Local Government officer, Volunteer organiser, Police.


S2 RMPS

The knowledge that RMPS develops is extremely important in understanding the world and the society that we live in. For example, global events and the media have led to some having a distorted view of the religion of Islam. In S2 RMPS we hope to address misconceptions of this kind.

Islam is the second largest religion in the world today, with over 1.4 billion followers. It is the second largest in Scotland. Islam is also one of the most misunderstood faiths of this world.

The Scottish Curriculum for Excellence states that the challenge of religions to our society are to be explored. One of the most pressing problems facing our society is the exponential rise in Islamophobia and hate crime. This unit examines how the media’s portrayal of global events and terrorism can distort non-Muslims’ views of the religion. This unit tries to remedy this and to help pupils see that they themselves can play an active role in combating this potentially divisive problem.

Courses

In S2 RMPS pupils study one topic: Islam: Beliefs and Issues

  • Why study Islam?
  • Origins of Islam
  • Holy Book
  • Place of Worship
  • Muslim Beliefs and Practices
  • The Ummah
  • Issues for Islam today

In the class room

The focus is very much on active learning. Pupils will follow the course through a comprehensive set of PowerPoints with a wide variety of active tasks. Tasks include the use of priority pyramids, card sorts, pictures, card diamonds, library research visit, short video clips and written answers. Pupils are given a Skills and Homework booklet, outlining how to structure answers and possible homework questions for teachers to set as appropriate. Pupils are also given a Learning Log which outlines success criteria for specific assessed pieces and gives pupils a chance to evaluate their learning and set targets for the future. Pupils will also develop their Literacy, Numeracy, Health and Wellbeing throughout the S2 courses through a variety of tasks, peered work and group investigations.

World of work

Pupils will learn literacy and numeracy skills. They will learn how to select information and present arguments. Pupils will be encouraged to think critically and form reasoned opinions on a variety of issues. Jobs where RMPS would be useful include: Assistant-immigration-officer, Race Relations officer, MSP, MP, Local Government officer, Law, Volunteer organiser, Police.


S1 Modern Studies

Modern Studies is a subject specific to Scotland. It is a mix of politics, international relations and social issues that we face in the 21st century. Modern Studies is one of the most useful subjects for helping pupils understand the world we live in.

Courses

In S1 Modern Studies pupils study two topics:-

  • Democracy in the UK and Scotland
  • Children in Need

Course Content

Unit 1: Democracy in UK and Scotland:-

  • The Role of MP’s and MSP’s
  • The two parliaments: Westminster and Holyrood
  • Conflict and co-operation between the parliaments ( Brexit, Immigration, Trident, Voting)
  • Pressure Groups
  • North Korea: a dictatorship

Unit 2: Children in Need:-

  • The United Nations and Human Rights
  • Poverty in Scotland
  • Children in Conflict: Syria

S2 Modern Studies

S2 Modern Studies: One 6 week block/ One 4 week block

China

  • Facts about China
  • Flag
  • Government
  • Political rights
  • Human rights
  • Media
  • One Chid Policy
  • Social & economic inequalities

Unreported World

  • The media in the UK
  • LGBT in Jamaica
  • Robert Mugabe and Zimbabwe
  • Group investigation into an issue of their choice

In the class room

The focus is very much on active learning. Pupils will follow the course through a comprehensive set of PowerPoints with a wide variety of active tasks. Tasks include the use of priority pyramids, card sorts, pictures, maps, card diamonds, library research visit, short video clips and written answers. Pupils are given a Skills and Homework booklet, outlining how to structure answers and possible homework questions for teachers to set as appropriate. Pupils are also given a Learning Log which outlines success criteria for specific assessed pieces and gives pupils a chance to evaluate their learning and set targets for the future. Pupils will also develop their Literacy, Numeracy, Health and Wellbeing throughout the S2 courses through a variety of tasks, peered work and group investigations.

World of work

Pupils will learn literacy and numeracy skills. They will learn how to select information and present arguments. Pupils will be encouraged to think critically and question evidence, determining if statements show bias and exaggeration. Jobs where Modern Studies would be useful include: academic, librarian, the police, journalist, solicitor, researcher, social worker, teacher, government work.


National 4/5 History

In the National History course, pupils develop their understanding of the world by learning about other people and their values, in different times, places and circumstances. The course helps pupils to develop a map of the past and an appreciation and understanding of the forces which have shaped the world today.

History

Aims of the course

Pupils undertaking to study History in the Broad General Education and in the National Qualifications will be able to:

  • Explore, analyse, evaluate, problem-solve, and communicate
  • Develop a conceptual understanding of the past
  • Develop straightforward knowledge and understanding of the factors contributing to, and the impact of, historical events
  • Investigate historical events and form views
  • Explain historical events and draw straightforward conclusions

Pupils will experience:

  • Active, collaborative and independent learning
  • A blend of classroom approaches: whole class, small group or one to one discussions; direct interactive teaching
  • Space for personalisation and choice: Assignment topic choice
  • Collaborative learning: through discussion/debate; in groups, researching a topic and sharing findings with the class
  • Applying learning
  • Embedding literacy skills: selecting and assessing information, presenting findings; evaluating; debating; listening; reading; writing

Course Content

Scottish Unit: Scotland in the Era of WWI

A study of the experiences of Scots in the Great War and its impact on life in Scotland. This topic considers the impact of technology on the soldiers on the Western Front. It also considers the way in which the war changed life for people at home as the war began to impact on every aspect of life both during and after the war.

British Unit: The Atlantic Slave Trade 1770-1807

A study of the nature of the British Atlantic slave trade in the late eighteenth century, changing attitudes towards it in Britain and the pressures that led to its abolition, illustrating the themes of rights, exploitation and culture

Europe and the World : Germany and the Rise of the Nazis

A study of attempts to establish democracy in Weimar Germany, the reasons for its collapse and the nature of the Nazi State

Conditions of award

National 3

To achieve the National 3 History Course, pupils must pass all of the required Units. National 3 Courses are not graded.

National 4

To achieve the National 4 History Course, learners must pass all of the required Units, including the Added Value Unit National 4 Courses are not graded.

National 5: Exam

Question paper 80 marks

The question paper gives pupils an opportunity to demonstrate application of the following skills and breadth of knowledge and understanding from across the course.

Assignment 20 marks

The assignment gives candidates an opportunity to demonstrate the following skills, knowledge and understanding within the context of a historical question or issue.


National 4/5 Geography

There are three units in the N4/5 Geography Course:-

  • Physical Environments
  • Global Issues
  • Human Environments

Unit Content

Trips

In June of S3, pupils take part in our field trip to Loch Lomond to collect data for their Geography Assignment. The trip has run for a number of years and is very successful.


National 4/5 Modern Studies

In the National Modern Studies course, pupils develop their understanding of the principles of democracy, social and world issues. The course helps pupils to develop an understanding of the current political climate and appreciate the inequalities that those in Scotland and the rest of the world may face.

Aims of the course

Pupils undertaking to study Modern Studies in the Broad General Education and in the National Qualifications will develop:

  • A range of research and information-handling skills including: evaluating information/evidence in order to support and oppose a view; making decisions and drawing conclusions; constructing detailed arguments; communicating views, opinions, decisions and conclusions based on evidence.
  • A detailed understanding of the democratic process.
  • A detailed understanding of social and economic issues at local, Scottish, national and international levels.
  • Ways of addressing needs and inequalities and how effective they are.
  • An understanding of a world power: the political system as well as the social and economic inequalities that people face.

Pupils will experience:

  • Active, collaborative and independent learning
  • A blend of classroom approaches: whole class, small group or one to one discussions; direct interactive teaching
  • Space for personalisation and choice: Assignment topic choice
  • Collaborative learning: through discussion/debate; in groups, researching a topic and sharing findings with the class
  • Applying learning
  • Embedding literacy skills: selecting and assessing information, presenting findings; evaluating; debating; listening; reading; writing

Course Content

Political Unit: Democracy in the UK

During this unit pupils will study power and decision-making at UK level. Pupils will develop an understanding of the features of a democratic society, how power is distributed in the UK, how people can participate politically and what groups can influence the political process. Furthermore, pupils will study the election and role of representatives in the UK as well as the limits on representation.

Social Issues Unit: Crime and the Law

Pupils will explore the rate of crime in Scotland and the UK and will have a good understanding on the different types of crime committed, the causes of crime and the impact crime can have on individuals and society. Pupils will then go on to develop an understanding of the measures taken to tackle crime from a variety of groups including the government, the police, the courts and the prison system.

World Power Unit: The USA

Throughout this unit pupils will develop a good understanding of the US political system and how citizens can participate in decision-making in the USA. The unit will also cover how the USA has an influence on other countries in the word in terms of political, economic, military and cultural influence. Finally, pupils will investigate the social and economic inequalities that exist in the US, what the government has done to tackle these and how effective these measures have been.

Conditions of award

National 3

To achieve the National 3 Modern Studies Course, pupils must pass all of the required Units. National 3 Courses are not graded.

National 4

To achieve the National 4 Modern Studies Course, learners must pass all of the required Units, including the Added Value Unit National 4 Courses are not graded.

National 5 Exam Breakdown

 Component   Marks  Duration
 Assignment  20  1 Hour
 Exam  80  2 Hours 20 Min


National 4/5 Travel & Tourism

There are four units in the N4/5 Travel and Tourism Course:-

  • UK and World
  • Customer Service
  • Scotland
  • Employability

Unit Content
UK and World: Pupils will learn about the impact that mass tourism can have on destinations around the world. They will study three locations where they will research different tourist attractions. They will also develop their literacy, numeracy and organisational skills by researching and planning a travel itinerary for a customer. Lastly, they will write a report on tourism trends in the world.

Customer Service: Experiential learning and role play is used in this unit to help pupils develop their knowledge and understanding of the customer service industry. Here pupils will learn the skills of upselling and complaint handling.

Scotland: Pupils will learn about the impact that mass tourism can have on destinations around the Scotland, including Glasgow and the Isle of Skye. They will study three locations where they will research different tourist attractions. They will also develop their literacy, numeracy and organisational skills by researching and planning a travel itinerary for a customer. Lastly, they will write a report on tourism trends in Scotland.

Employability: Here pupils will finish the course by studying three job roles in the travel and tourism industry. They will undertake an audit of their own skills and develop a CV in relation to a job role.

Trips

Trips vary from year to year depending on availability. Trips include: Impact of Tourism Trip, Travel Agency Visits, Airport Tours. In addition, we welcome speakers such as cabin crew to come to the class to discuss their job.

Assessment

There is no exam for Travel and Tourism. It is an internally assessed course, but will be moderated and verified by the SQA. There are 16 outcomes to be completed in order to achieve a full pass at National 4 or National 5 level. High levels of attendance are necessary to complete this course.
Please see a list of assessment deadlines for 2018/19:-


Higher History

Higher History reflects Curriculum for Excellence values, purposes and principles. It offers flexibility, provides time for learning, focus on skills and applying learning, and provides scope for personalisation and choice. Pupils will acquire breadth and depth in their knowledge and understanding of the past through the study of British, European and world, and Scottish contexts in a variety of time periods. Pupils will develop:

  • a conceptual understanding of the past and an ability to think independently
  • a range of skills including the ability to apply a detailed historical perspective in a range of contexts
  • the skills of analysing various interpretations of historical sources and critically evaluating a variety of views
  • an understanding of the relationship between factors contributing to, and the impact of, historical events
  • the skills of analysing, evaluating and synthesising historical information
  • the skills of researching complex historical issues, drawing well-reasoned conclusions

Entry requirements: Pupils should have achieved the National 5 History course or equivalent qualifications and/or experience prior to starting this course.

Scottish Unit: Scottish Wars of Independence

Political change and military conflict arising from the Wars of Independence. Themes: authority, conflict and identity.

British Unit: Britain: 1850-1951

Development of the United Kingdom into a modern democracy and the development of the role of the state in the welfare of its citizens. Themes: authority, ideology and rights.

Europe and the World Unit: USA, 1918-68

Growing tensions in American society, focusing on racial divisions, economic difficulties, the growth of federal powers and the struggle for civil rights. Themes: ideology, identity and rights.

Component

 

Marks

Duration

Component 1: question paper 1— British, European and world history

44

1 hour and 30 minutes

Component 2: question paper 2 — Scottish

History

36

1 hour and 30 minutes

Component 3: assignment

30

1 hour and 30 minutes

 

 

 


Higher Geography

There are three units in the Higher Geography Course:-

  • Global issues
  • Human Environments
  • Physical Environments

Unit Content

Trips

In term 1 pupils visit the CBD and inner city of Glasgow to take part in an Urban Study. This allows them to collect data for their Higher Geography Assignment, worth 30% of their overall grade.


Higher Modern Studies

Higher Modern StudiesHigher Modern Studies reflects Curriculum for Excellence values, purposes and principles. It offers flexibility, provides time for learning, focus on skills and applying learning, and provides scope for personalisation and choice.

Pupils will acquire breadth and depth in their knowledge and understanding of current events through the study of British democracy, social issues in the UK and development issues in Africa.
Pupils develop a range of research, analytical and evaluating skills, and an understanding of:

  • the democratic process and complex political issues
  • complex social and economic issues at local, Scottish, national and international levels, and ways of addressing needs and inequalities
  • different views about the extent of state involvement in society
  • the nature and processes of conflict resolution
  • the importance of human and legal rights and responsibilities, and their application in different societies

Entry requirements: Pupils should have achieved the National 5 History course or equivalent qualifications and/or experience prior to starting this course.

Unit 1: Democracy in the UK in Scotland
In this unit pupils will cover the election and role of representatives in the UK Parliament. The course will also cover the factors which influence voting behaviour in the UK and ways in which individuals and groups in society can influence government decision-making. In addition to this, issues such as possible alternatives to the governance of Scotland and the implications of the UK’s decision to leave the EU will be evaluated.

Unit 2: Social Issues in the UK
Pupils will focus on social inequality in the UK and will explore the reasons why income and wealth inequalities exist, the reasons why health inequalities exist and the impact inequalities have on certain groups in society. The course also focuses on the government measures that have been put in place in an attempt to reduce inequalities and pupils will critically evaluate whether these measures have been effective or if inequality still exists.

Unit 3: World Issue: Development Issues in Africa
In this unit pupils investigate the reasons why development issues exist in Africa. Pupils explore the reasons for poor development and the impact this has on the individuals, families and communities of those living in African countries. Pupils then go on to look at how governments and international organisations have attempted to tackle the issue of poor development as well as evaluating how effective these interventions have been.

Exam Breakdown

Component

Marks

Duration

Question paper 1

52

1 hour and 45 minutes

Question paper 2

28

1 hour and 15 minutes

Assignment

30

1 hour and 30 minutes


Religious, Moral & Philosophical Studies – Higher/National 5

RMPS involves studying the beliefs and practices of the major world religions, philosophical and theological answers to ultimate questions and in depth study of modern ethical issues. You do not have to have any religious belief yourself to be able to appreciate, enjoy and succeed in this course. Students will have multiple opportunities to explore their own beliefs on a variety of engaging and exciting contemporary issues. The course aims to build on the transferrable skills which students developed in their National Qualifications. The course challenges students to develop their extended writing skills and to critically analyse and investigate the religious, moral and philosophical questions and issues which stem from our studies.

Course Content

The course is split into three mandatory units and an assignment.

World Religion – Christianity

In this Unit, students will develop skills to interpret and comment on the meaning and context of sources related to the religion selected for study. They will develop in-depth factual and abstract knowledge and understanding of the impact and significance of religion today through studying key beliefs, practices and sources found within Christianity and the contribution these make to the lives of followers and society.

Morality and Belief – Morality and Medicine

In this unit, students will develop skills to explain and express reasoned views about Euthanasia, Organ Donation and Genetic Engineering. They will develop detailed factual and theoretical understanding of these moral issues and will explore various responses to them, including religious and philosophical perspectives.

Religious and Philosophical Questions – Origins

This unit is an examination of the different ideas that there are on the origins of the Universe and life of Earth. Students will look at how modern scientific theories may challenge religious beliefs and how members of the various religious traditions and denominations respond to these challenges. The unit looks at the question of whether modern scientific views are compatible with religious belief. For example, is it possible to believe in modern science’s theories about the origins of life and in a creator God?

Assignment

Students should choose a religious, moral or philosophical issue for study which allows them to investigate relevant religious and non-religious view. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of religion and the impact it has on society today. This unit will provide rich opportunities for students to choose a range of possible titles for their assignment, for example:

  • Is it right for a secular state to ban the wearing of religious symbols in public?
  • Why would a loving God allow evil and suffering in the world?
  • Is it ever morally right to own/use nuclear weapons

Assessment

Higher - The course assessment structure consists of two final question papers (paper 1 - 60 marks and paper 2 - 20 marks) and the assignment (30 marks).

National 5 - The course assessment structure consists of the final question paper (80 marks) and the assignment (20 marks).

Skills

RMPS develops thinking skills that are attractive to employers. In the world of work, employers look for someone with an enquiring mind, an appreciation of different viewpoints, and an ability to come to clear, balanced decision. These skills are all developed through studying RMPS.

Career Opportunities

Employers, universities, and colleges look at the skills the person has gained on that course and how it helps them to engage with their chosen path. If you intend to work with people in a care setting, journalism, publishing, teaching, counselling, law or tourism, this course gives you plenty to think about and valuable expertise. RMPS alongside other subjects at Higher would help to demonstrate breadth of study in achievement, which is something universities value. All universities accept and welcome students with Higher RMPS onto a variety of courses, including Strathclyde University Law School, St. Andrews University and the University of Edinburgh.